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Posts from the ‘Independent vs. Interdependent’ Category


Daring to Dream

Excerpt taken from Life Lessons for Leaders from the Old Testament

Genesis 37:5

     The story of Joseph is a sad one, but also one of great victory after tremendous perseverance. There is hardly a better type of Christ found in the Scriptures. Hated by his brethren for doing what was right, and suffering for sins he did not commit, Joseph stands out as an excellent example of a man whose sole purpose was to live a life of integrity and usefulness. Read more »


Building Strong Local Churches Through Team Ministry

A great commitment to a great commandment and the great commission will grow a great church!
(Purpose Driven Church, Rick Warren, p. 102)

The foundation of your church will determine both its size and strength. One can never build larger than the foundation can handle.

Matthew 22:37-40

Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. 38This is the first and great commandment. 39And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. 40On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.

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The Indigineous Church – Part 1

Abraham Lincoln, a famous president of the United States of America, once said, “You cannot help men permanently by doing for them what they could and should do for themselves.”

Once national churches have been founded and are growing, the missionary must be careful not to slow down the speedy growth of the church. Church growth and evangelism can come to a standstill when leaders become satisfied with maintaining the church organization as it is. It is necessary to understand that when referring to a “missionary,” it could mean anyone, from anywhere, including any race of people. The great commission was given to the entire church regardless of location, income level, or social status. Read more »


Keep Your Motives Right!

“He did not say this because he cared about the poor but because he was a thief; as keeper of the money bag, he used to help himself to what was put into it” (John 12:6, NIV).

A motive is a need or desire that causes a person to act or speak. The biblical example of Judas, shows how dangerous it is if our motives do not match our words. Let’s speculate for a moment. When this incident took place John probably did not know Judas was a thief.  When Judas said this, it sounded good and maybe even right to John. Yes, he probably thought, “We meet poor people every day and this ointment is worth a lot of money. Yes, we could help many people with this money.”  It was much later while writing his letter about the life and times of Jesus that it was all clear to him. John could not help himself; he had to mention Judas’ wrong motives. Spoken words do not always reflect what is in the heart.  Read more »


Practical Leadership

We are inundated today by leadership theories – how to do this, what to say when, or which profiles we should develop or try to emulate. They are not all bad; in fact, most are good and profitable in some way. Many are drawn from the Scriptures. We often take them with a grain of salt and a “Yea, yea, sure, sure.” Perhaps what we need now is not another theory of leadership but the exercise of leadership. Read more »